The Next Level of Driverless Cars How to Solve the Problem of Humans Falling asleep

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Driverless Cars

Yes, that time of our lives is already here when we will be dealing with driverless cars. These cars are incredible, structured through rare and unique automobile parts and spares found to be nowhere but customized and designed to meet perfection. Recently, researchers have stated that ‘The Next Wave of Development will see drivers only expected to intervene when the car requests it’ and studies have shown that drivers can fail to spot when systems reach their limits and can have trouble retaking control of the vehicle, especially in an emergency. However, the goal of a completely driverless car is considered to be among the top of a six-level scale of autonomy, which researchers believe might be possible to achieve that aim one day but for now, cars are stuck at the level two on the scale, in which the driver must still perform several key aspects of driving and engineers are still working out on how to crack the solution to this, of keeping drivers alert as they are in the driverless cars.


Imagine yourself, driving down the motorway in a swanky semi-autonomous car – the vehicle is on its own, humming along smoothly and then a slip in the road takes off. The only trouble is, you’ve fallen asleep. What shall you do to keep things under control?

Experts are working on sensor-based systems geared towards providing a solution; moving to a higher level, in which the driver (in level three) would only be expected to be ready to intervene when the car requests it.
Experts are working on sensor-based systems geared towards providing a solution; moving to a higher level, in which the driver (in level three) would only be expected to be ready to intervene when the car requests it.

Anything less than fully automated driving will introduce new challenges for the people who ride along. So, experimental studies demonstrate that drivers can fail to notice when systems reach their limits and can have trouble retaking control of the vehicle, especially in emergency situations.

By tapping into our understanding of sleep, stress, inattention, and anxiety in humans, and knowledge of challenges such as weather and road conditions, The Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute are working on sensor-based systems to spot when the transition from car to the driver might be hazardous and ensure drivers can take the helm safely. The systems, it seems, will be sophisticated.

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